September 2020 Health Newsletter

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Current Articles

» Boost Your Immunity with ACUPUNCTURE and CHINESE MEDICINE
» Chiropractic and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
» Meditation and Exercise May Reduce Cold Symptoms
» Beat Insomnia With More Exercise

Boost Your Immunity with ACUPUNCTURE and CHINESE MEDICINE

The cold season can prove to be a difficult time for many of us to keep healthy and fight off the seasonal colds and flu. Chinese Medicine, by the use of acupuncture, dietary therapy and Chinese herbs, offers a natural alternative to help your body stay balanced and function at its best. The stimulation of certain acupuncture points has been proven to increase the number of white blood cells which fight off infections, boost your lungs function and lower the levels of stress-induced hormones, such as cortisol, which suppress your immune system. Given the preventative power of this medicine, regular acupuncture treatments in conjunction with herbs (when needed) are recommended during this time of the year.
Here’s a few additional tips that will improve your chances at staying healthy:

• eat foods that are warm, cooked and nourishing as this helps your body have more energy for fighting off the bugs that you come in contact with; this is the perfect time for making teas, soups, stews and steaming foods
• make sure you are eating enough vegetables and fruits daily; cruciferous veggies such as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, swiss chard, bok choy, and daikon radish increase immune cells and reduce your chances of developing certain types of cancer; carrots, goji berries, sweet potato, spinach, butternut squash are rich in beta-carotene and promote new skin cells as well as protect the mucosal lining of the lungs and digestive system; increase intake of vitamin C rich foods such as watermelon and cantaloupe, kiwis, strawberries, blackberries, grapefruits, red and yellow peppers
• avoid eating lots of dairy, salads, or other cold, raw foods; avoid eating large portions, rather eat frequent small meals
• keep energy up and avoid exhausting yourself
• be sure to get enough sleep and rest
• avoid stress and emotional issues
• when you go out into a windy and cold environment, keep warm and protect yourself with clothing such as a scarf
• after washing your hair, make sure it is dry before going outside or before going to bed
• a cool shower once a day boosts immunity
• exercise outside, whatever the weather, is beneficial
• take probiotics- beneficial bacteria when properly maintained in your gut are one of the body’s strongest lines of defense.

Author: Dr. Ramona Goldman
Source: 2014 Newsletter


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Chiropractic and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) affects more than 3 million people annually and occurs when there is compression of the median nerve where the nerve runs through the carpal bones of the wrist. The result is numbness, tingling and/or weakness in the hand. A review of CTS studies that include joint mobilization indicates, according to researchers, "…joint mobilization was associated with positive clinical effects for persons with CTS." Joint mobilization of the wrist is nothing more than introducing safe, controlled force to the carpal bones of the wrist in order to reduce pressure to the median nerve, break adhesions and improve blood flow. Doctors of chiropractic are trained and fully skilled in the art of joint mobilization, which is commonly called "adjustments." If you are suffering from CTS, or similar soft tissue ailment, we encourage you to consider chiropractic care today.


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JMPT Online, August 26, 2020.


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Meditation and Exercise May Reduce Cold Symptoms

A small study conducted by the University of Wisconsin-Madison indicates that meditation and exercise significantly reduced the number of days people missed work due to colds or flu. The results need to be confirmed, but could add another tool to the prevention options available for the respiratory illnesses. Currently there is no vaccine for the common cold, and flu vaccines are only effective 60-70% of the time. The only other preventative measures available for the illnesses are hand washing and to avoid contact with infected persons. While the common cold and most strains of the flu are considered mild by doctors, the estimated costs of them to society run into billions of dollars annually. Working from a thesis that exercise and meditation could prevent illness, Dr. Bruce Barrett and his colleagues randomly assigned 149 patients into three groups; one group participated in an eight week exercise training, one group participated in an eight week meditation training and the third participated as a control and received no special instructions. After the training periods were completed, the researchers tracked illness incidents in the groups through cold and flu season. Of the 50 people in the control group, 40 got sick as opposed to 27 in the meditation group and 26 in the exercise group. Furthermore, the exercise and meditation groups reported feeling sick for an average of only five days, while the control group felt ill for nine. The exercise and meditation groups also missed less work. The researchers speculate that exercise helped strengthen the immune systems of test subjects, while meditation left subjects better prepared to cope with the effects of illness. Dr. Barrett stated however, that the findings were preliminary and needed more study.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Ann Fam Med. July/August 2012. Vol. 10, No. 4.


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Beat Insomnia With More Exercise

For the nearly half of Americans who experience occasional insomnia, and the 22 percent who suffer from the condition nightly, a new survey by the non-profit National Sleep Foundation suggests the key to restful sleep is vigorous exercise. The survey of 1,000 people, conducted by phone and over the internet, indicates that people who exercise regularly have less problems getting to sleep and enjoy a better quality of sleep than those who do not. More than 75 percent of the respondents who reported themselves as working out regularly reported sleeping well, as compared to just over half of the people who reported not exercising at all. Interestingly, both groups reported getting the same amount of sleep; an average of just under seven hours a night during the work week. However, respondents who were physically active reported falling asleep more quickly, experiencing less sleeping problems and needing less sleep to function during the day. The sedentary people reported problems falling asleep at night, staying asleep, keeping awake during the day, taking more naps and exhibiting more symptoms of sleep apnea, a condition that causes breathing problems while sleeping. The experts concluded that even ten minutes of exercise a day could have a significant impact on the duration and quality of sleep.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: National Sleep Foundation’s 2013 Sleep in America® poll. March 4, 2013.


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